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Members Forums => Pulp Fiction => Topic started by: Smithk4 on September 19, 2012, 08:53:50 AM

Title: Sky bags exclusive rights Warner Bros. movie catalog
Post by: Smithk4 on September 19, 2012, 08:53:50 AM
Sky bags exclusive rights Warner Bros. movie catalog, makes LoveFilm and others wait

(http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2012/09/murdochmatrix-1348055492.jpg)

Sky has bested its broadcast and video-on-demand rivals by signing a deal with Warner Bros. for exclusive rights to its films in the UK and Ireland. Once the six-month cinema window has elapsed, each new flick (including Man of Steel and The Dark Knight Rises) will remain Murdoch-only for a full year before arriving on LoveFilm and its kind. Meanwhile, back-catalog titles like The Lord of the Rings and The Matrix will remain locked in the partnership's walled garden for an undisclosed period of time. Good news if you're a Sky customer, we suppose, and not if you're not.

I am a Sky customer, but I can't afford the Movie channels and box office is too expensive  :o It will cause LoveFilm & Netflix to do the same with other publishers. Which means you need all three subscriptions if you want access to any film.
Title: Re: Sky bags exclusive rights Warner Bros. movie catalog
Post by: nCogNeato on September 19, 2012, 01:45:24 PM
... It will cause LoveFilm & Netflix to do the same with other publishers. Which means you need all three subscriptions if you want access to any film.

Which is why I cancelled my subscription to Netflix last year.  The trend of exclusivity needs to stop.  When exclusivity becomes the main focus of an industry, everyone loses.

I don't favor piracy.  I like to give the people responsible for creating content I love the money they deserve.  But as a savvy consumer, I know when I'm being taken advantage of.  And when that happens, I know there are other ways to get the content I want.

Until these companies realize this and make content easily accessible for everyone willing to pay for it, the number of people not willing to pay for it will continue to grow.  The biggest contributor to online piracy is industry policy.