Author Topic: The Gaming Lists Thread  (Read 10057 times)

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Offline Failed

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #45 on: July 09, 2010, 06:00:33 AM »
It's not a list about what games are crap, the list is for the most disapointing games.

They were all hyped to amazingness and well, didn't turn out like that.

So Alpha Protocol should have been there. Perfect Dark was never close to the predecessor, even though it was still a good game. I still don't get why Prototype is in there.

Offline TaraJayne

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #46 on: July 09, 2010, 09:39:01 AM »
Two Worlds and Panzer Dragoon Orta I think it was called on The Xbox. I love Panzer Dragoon on the Saturn
Can't wait for Shenmue 3



I hate jokes that rely on visual imagery.

I've had it right up to here with them.

Offline sambo

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #47 on: July 09, 2010, 11:47:01 AM »

Offline GamerMan316

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #48 on: July 26, 2010, 08:33:18 PM »


Offline sambo

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Offline Handshakes

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #50 on: July 27, 2010, 10:17:45 PM »
I just played Rogue Warrior and Mickey Rourkes rap at the end is awesome!

 :D

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsusJVaAWf8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsusJVaAWf8</a>



I know I missed this part of the thread by a month, but after seeing that rap I just have to say...

I MUST have this game now.
Your mom!

Offline sambo

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #51 on: August 20, 2010, 08:33:02 AM »

Offline Lukehi

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #52 on: August 20, 2010, 01:00:34 PM »
Worst Ideas On 360


Prince of Persia Reboot


The reboot itself wasn't the problem, per se. It was the cel-shaded look, the dramatic change in the Price's personality and worst of all, the lack of dying. It should have made the game less frustrating and more enjoyable. Instead, it made the game less dramatic and more dull. Still, at least the ending was surprisingly bleak and downbeat, showing how brave the designers are. Until they nullified that with DLC. Whoops

I really like this game...very under-rated.



Putting the "stud" back in Bible Study

Offline Failed

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #53 on: August 20, 2010, 01:10:20 PM »
new PoP is better.

Offline GamerMan316

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #54 on: August 25, 2010, 01:24:40 PM »


Offline dfusioness

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #55 on: August 25, 2010, 02:07:52 PM »
could be wrong but i think elder scrolls oblivion is pretty big if u dont do the missions straightaway you're looking at a big game , especially with the dlc

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #56 on: August 25, 2010, 03:34:09 PM »
could be wrong but i think elder scrolls oblivion is pretty big if u dont do the missions straightaway you're looking at a big game , especially with the dlc

you are right vicki. I have sunk a good 50 hours plus into that game so far, and i still have loads to do, not to mention the dlc! I actually prefer it to morrowind too, which was also an amazing game!

Offline dfusioness

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #57 on: October 14, 2010, 01:11:50 PM »
couldnt find where to put my list of games, sorry, but i got a few already !!
 gears of war 1
grid-on its way
gears 2-on its way
red dead redemption
3d minigolf
kung fu panda
fight night round 3
table tennis

 crap list i know but we all have to start somewhere  :'(

Offline GamerMan316

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #58 on: October 14, 2010, 01:17:58 PM »
couldnt find where to put my list of games, sorry, but i got a few already !!
 gears of war 1
grid-on its way
gears 2-on its way
red dead redemption
3d minigolf
kung fu panda
fight night round 3
table tennis

 crap list i know but we all have to start somewhere  :'(

We did have a thread on this i'm sure of it, it may have been on the old site.

You can post you multiplayer games here so people can see what games you play online.   :)


Offline sambo

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Re: The Gaming Lists Thread
« Reply #59 on: January 05, 2011, 03:14:48 PM »
 
      Gaming's 20 biggest myths busted

You know the rules. We all do. For better or for worse, they've become part of modern games design: barrels explode when you shoot them. Necks can be snapped with a single twist. Health packs give you 75 per cent of your health back. But could any of it actually happen? We collected the more common in-game rules and asked the experts what they thought.

Would a soldier really try and throw a grenade back at the enemy before it detonated?

Maybe, but it's unlikely. "The most basic human instinct is to run like hell and dive in a hole if you can," advises Lt Col Frank Keirsey, 24-year US Army veteran and advisor to the Call of Duty series. He's backed up by Commander Richard Marcinko, founder of Navy SEAL Team 6 and star of Rogue Warrior. "Throwing the grenade back is a reflexive reaction, not something you would train to do," he says.

If you did throw it, your chances aren't good. "If your opponent has not 'cooked off' the grenade, you have two to four seconds," says Kiersey. "So if the grenade landed close to your hand, and you were especially nimble, and there was no place to dive - yes, you might grab it and throw it. But I can't recall a recent account of a guy throwing a grenade back." Marcinko isn't sold either: "Not all grenades are the same. How long is the fusing mechanism? What type of grenade is it? Fragmentation? Pressure? Smoke? Flashbang?"

Verdict: No



 
Do zombies exist? If so, is zombism contagious?

Wow: "A qualified yes," says Dr Jude Kelly of the College of the Holy Cross, New England. "There is one disease in particular that the whole zombie thing might have been based on." African Sleeping Sickness, spread by tsetse flies, has a range of unnerving symptoms, including "a change in personality, slurred speech, irritability, and difficulty walking." Victims tend to sleep all day and have insomnia at night. Professor Sanjeev Krishna of St George's, University of London, supplied more details: "This is an infection that carries nightmarish qualities, reducing many of its victims to a zombie-like state before they go into a coma and die." But what about that classic Romero breaking-out-of-coffins thing? Do those zombies exist? No, they don't, our experts said.

Verdict: Almost

When do we get lightsabers? How about the Covenant energy sword?

Not yet. "A blade can't be made of light alone, since beams of light don't repel one another," offers Dr Kelley, although he doesn't rule it out completely. "If you changed the focal point of a pulsed laser along a set distance, the laser would ionise the surrounding air at each point, producing small plasmas. Create enough of these in a line, and you have a blade. It wouldn't block another similar blade, but it could conceivably slice through objects." So duels are out, but you could hurt someone - probably yourself, warns Kelley. "It'd need a huge, non-portable power source, would make a lot of noise, be extremely bright and probably blind or burn anyone you pointed it at."

Verdict: Probably never


 
Can you gene-splice your way to superhuman abilities?

Possibly. It turns out that BioShock's Andrew Ryan was way, way ahead of his time. "Gene therapy is a relatively young field that has shown some promise for the treatment of hereditary diseases," says Dr Kelley. "The simple idea is to replace a faulty gene with a more functional one." However, frost powers are a long way down the list, says Dr Frederick Chen of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington. "We have only recently mapped the human genome, so manipulating it is still a long way off. Superpowers will probably have to wait until after we fix congenital defects, chronic illnesses, and cancer."

Even once Alzheimer's is cured, plasmids will have problems. "Gene splicing toward superpowers would require replacing normal genes with superpowered ones," says Dr Kelley. "You would need to either borrow or create genes that grant superpowers. Real-life genetic mutations usually do more harm than good, so we don't have the raw material we would need for these genes." Dammit.

Kelley reckons it isn't too far-fetched to imagine gene therapy granting more useful powers, though - "immunity to diseases, slower aging, resistance to toxins, things like that."

Verdict: Yes

Do soldiers regularly take weapons, ammo, and other supplies from the corpses of their dead enemies?

"Only if they are working behind enemy lines," says Richard Marcinko. "Of course, there are no defined lines in Afghanistan or Iraq. Special ops guys do it to make sure they have supplies if they're doing true clandestine or covert ops. With terrorists, I'd take it to deny their use by someone else. A seasoned operator will booby-trap what he can't carry."

In more conventional fights, Lt Col Keirsey says some enemy gear might be "thrown into the cargo hold of a supply Humvee headed to the rear, to get tagged." But picking up a newer weapon is unlikely, because a trained soldier is far more likely to hold on the gear they know best. "During the fight, unless your weapon is damaged or out of ammo, your weapon is the girl you brought to the dance," he says. "You have babied it, cleaned it, tuned it, made it fit your style, zeroed it perfectly. Why on earth would you want to pick up some loser-slob's piece? It didn't seem to do him much good."

Verdict: Almost never

Can a commando quickly snap an enemy's neck with his bare hands?

Yes, but Marcinko calls it "a tactic of last resort. Although it can be done, it can be noisy; either the act itself or the body dropping. Being that close to the enemy also invites your own vulnerabilities. Murphy's Law can and will be present."

Verdict: Yes


 
Will playing drums in games train you to be a drummer in real life?

Tricky one, this, because we were asking people before Rock Band 3 came out. "Rock Band has made playing music more accessible to people," admits drum instructor Paul Abbott. "But the step from the Rock Band drum set to an actual drum set... well, that's a big step." Tutor and musician Brian Andres is more scathing: "taking a Breathalyser doesn't make you a better trumpet player." He does admit that Beat and Fill Trainers in Rock Band 2 have "some legitimacy" - at least more than simply following the cues of someone else's song.

Both agree that the biggest problem is that game drums simply don't feel or respond like the real thing. "Even the best electronic sets don't translate into low-latency playability or the feel of a real acoustic kit," says Abbott, while Andres likens using the Rock Band 2 kit to playing "digital Whack-A-Mole."

With the addition of Rock Band 3's pro-guitar and pro-keyboard mode (along with the new pro peripherals and support for the Ion Drum Rocker), these games are becoming more suitable for teaching real skills, but real life still has the edge. So, for now...

Verdict: Unlikely

Can you increase magical powers with a potion?

Yes, according to Bryn Truett-Chavez: herbalist, priestess in the Sisterhood of the Silver Branch, and owner of True Spirit Healing Arts in Los Gatos, California. "Your right brain is open to seeing and experiencing the aspects of life beyond the physical," she explains. "The ingredients in a potion crafted for this purpose will quiet the practical left half of the brain to let the right brain work its, well, magic.

Truett-Chavez says a proper brew "can increase all of the user's capabilities - physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual. These are the faculties which are employed in the use of magic in its simplest, purest forms." Just don't expect an instant power-up; they usually take ten minutes to kick in.

Verdict: Yes


 
Is portal technology possible?

Probably not. Imagine space as a flat piece of paper, says Dr Kelley. "One way to travel across the page is to 'walk' along the surface," he explains. "Another, more clever way would be to fold it so the opposite sides are touching, and cut a hole through the overlapping sheets. Walk through, and you're on the other side of the sheet."

Great! So why don't we just get some really big scissors? "The problem here is bending space to that degree," says Dr Kelley. "Some suggest that black holes do such a thing, but the gravitational forces around a black hole are not something our frail bodies could readily survive. It'd be a one-way trip at best, and we'd probably be unrecognisable on the other side - if there is one."

Verdict: No

Can you really pick a lock with a pin, like in Fallout 3?

Yes, but a paper clip works better and you should bring a tension wrench to finish the job. You can see for yourself how it's done by watching the handy video at http://tinyurl.com/pickalock - which, naturally, we don't suggest you try recreating yourself. How about escaping from prison, as seen in key plot moments from countless games and indeed movies? US prison officer Daylan Kinser says you could probably use a hairgrip to pick handcuffs with "a bit of dexterity."

But you wouldn't actually get out of your government-mandated holiday location: the pin would break if you tried to pick a heavy prison lock.

Verdict: Yes

Can a human being really "double-jump" in mid-air?

To absolutely nobody's surprise: No. "As much as I'd like for it to be true, a double-jump as depicted in videogames is really not possible," says Jarik R Sikat, 14-year scholar of Chinese martial art Wushu. He defines a double-jump as "the ability to jump in mid-air."

When we observe the human action of jumping, our bodies are exerting a greater force against the ground than the force of gravity pulling us to Earth. When that force is exerted we leave the ground. As we rise into the air, the force of the Earth's gravity slows us and pulls us back down. If our bodies were to 'double-jump' in mid-air or at the apex of the jump, we would still need a surface against which we could exert a downward force greater than the force of pulling down on our bodies - but alas, that surface is absent."

There isn't even any scientific breakthrough on the horizon to turn this around. "Unfortunately there isn't any sort of martial or acrobatic technique to overcome this," says Sikat. "Imagine trying to bounce a ball against the air so that it comes back to you. It's just not possible." The closest thing we'll get to seeing something like that, as Dr Chen points out, is parkour runners - the closest gaming is going to get to reality is Faith's leaping in Mirror's Edge. For proof, see the video at http://tinyurl.com/da6bqj.

Verdict: No


 
Can a commando really hide in the shadows to avoid detection from a nearby enemy?

Turns out it's "very easy" to become one with the darkness, and it's ears rather than eyes that give you away. "The key is to move slowly and steady, not in quick dashes," advises Marcinko. "Noise is a factor that has advantages and consequences. Use ambient noise to mask movement and be aware of wild game that can alert others to your presence."

Verdict: Yes

Can a soldier carry nine or ten guns at a time?

A soldier can carry three or four at the most. Forget games in which you collect nine or ten weapons, all of which fit invisibly into one backpack. In fact, forget the number altogether. "The number of guns is not as important as the number of rounds of ammunition that is carried," explains Marcinko. "A practical loadout would be one assault weapon, one suppressed weapon, and one secondary or backup weapon, augmented with comms, grenades, and a functional knife (a tool and a weapon combined). Ten weapons with ammunition cannot be logistically supported on one human frame! Reality kicks in when there are no bullets in the gun."

Keirsey agrees, Soldiers usually carry "only one long gun and a pistol at most. Some outfits will hang a shotgun on their kit if they are doing breaching. A boot knife or a K-bar is on your kit if things really go to crap, but a soldier is already carrying far too much equipment as it is to strap on any additional guns."

Verdict: No


 
Do warehouses really stack crates so you can climb them?

Not since the invention of shelves, says customs house broker Daniel Nolan. "Most warehouses I've seen or worked in mainly use pallet racking and shelving for storage of heavy crates," he says. "The pallet racks are arranged so you can easily drive and manoeuvre a forklift or other piece of loading equipment easily, so there's a good amount of space in between them."

The only things stacked on the floor are things on their way in or out, which won't be stacked more than two high. And they certainly won't be placed for easy climbing to the manager's office to grab the blue keycard. "You could probably climb one," admits Nolan, "but it wouldn't get you anywhere but up, and probably not to the ceiling or rafters."

Verdict: No

Would a commando really infiltrate a building by crawling through ventilation shafts?

It's possible, but Marcinko doesn't recommend it. "Insertion and extractions are very critical points in every mission. Sewer systems are roomier and dirtier, so no one goes near them for guarded access, but they, of course, only get you in a building not through a building."

If you've decided vents are the only way to go, you'd better not weigh much and carry even less. Marcinko says you'll have to be of "slight build" and need to leave most of your gear behind, since it could easily get snagged and only adds weight. "The hangers that hold the ventilation systems were not designed to hold the weight of a combatant. Getting in the system is one process, finding a vent in the target area big enough to get out is another - and getting out can you leave you vulnerable and exposed."

Verdict: Unlikely

Would a barrel of fuel really explode if you shot it? What about a vehicle?

Depends on how you shoot it, and with what. In a drum filled with petrol, "the vapour is more volatile than the fuel, and it needs a spark to ignite the fuel," says Marcinko. If the bullet scraping against the metal wall creates that spark, you might get the barrel to catch, but it's not likely.

Marcinko reckons cars might be a better target. "With a vehicle," says, "there are more metal parts that can cause the friction or spark to get sufficient ignition." Keirsey's not so sure, since gas tanks are generally designed specifically to avoid that kind of thing. "I've seen a large number of rounds fired into commercial vehicles and have yet to see one erupt into a Hollywood fireball," he says, although concedes that it's "definitely possible."

One way to make it more possible: make sure you pack the right explosive ammo. "Tracer rounds bring their own spark," suggests Marcinko. "An old rule of thumb would be one tracer round every fifth round. But if you want to deny your location, don't use tracers because the enemy can see where it came from on its way to target." So you'd need to make sure that your enemy will be taken out by whatever you're blowing up.

Verdict: Yes

Can a medkit really boost your health?

Yes! Sort of. "Most med kits contain plasters and aspirin, hardly the stuff to replenish your life-energy bar," says Dr Chen. "However, there are a couple of medications that produce near-miraculous results. Naloxone reverses the effects of narcotic drugs and can awaken someone from the near-death of a heroin overdose. An epinephrine injection can be instantly life-saving for someone with a severe allergic reaction. They work in seconds but usually aren't helpful for gunshot wounds."

Verdict: Yes

Can bands turn bad gigs into good ones if a musician utterly fails?

Yes, but you have to be a really good band. Kiss guitarist and vocalist Paul Stanley had a heart attack preparing for a gig in 2007. While paramedics resuscitated him, the band still managed to perform 14 songs for the fans, some of whom were invited up on stage to help out.
The mid-gig drop-out was tested by Who drummer Keith Moon. He mixed huge amounts of brandy with strong tranquillisers before a show in 1973 and collapsed during the performance, only be revived with a cortisone shot. After he passed out at the drums a second time, the roadies carried him offstage and frontman Pete Townshend asked the audience for Star Power.

Nineteen-year-old audience member Scot Halpin was handed a pair of sticks and a shot of brandy to calm his nerves, and had 15 minutes of fame playing with the band as they finished the set.

Verdict: Yes

Can you really break open a crate by repeatedly hitting it with a crowbar?

"No way," says Shannon Taylor, of chemical distributor ArmorThane USA. "Not only do you have to pry it open, quite often you have to unscrew it. If you continued to hit the crate, it would eventually split - but only a piece at a time, and nothing would fall out. Crates typically have two-by-fours in the corners that hold them together. They aren't meant to be opened easily." Daniel Nolan agrees: "If you tried to smash a crate with a crowbar, you'd be there a while. Any decent shipping crate would hold up in most cases."

Verdict: No

Do princesses really need regular rescuing?

They used to, says Lucinda Rumsey, medieval lecturer at Mansfield College, University of Oxford. "Romantic inclinations aside, aristocratic families in fiction and history wanted to keep control of who the women in their families slept with," she explains, "because they wanted to know who the father of any children were. Otherwise there could be legal quarrels about inheritance."

Not something that's played a big part in videogames lately, but their being significant characters is more accurate. "Princesses tend to be used as pawns in the games of money and power, so they also get married off to cement alliances or patch up feuds." So the concept of having to rescue a young lady held against her will isn't entirely baseless.

Verdict: Yes


 

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